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Archive for April, 2014

Well, I’m not sure that “lanterns” is the right word, given how big these are.(The main Buddha is about 10 feet, or 3 meters, tall.) But they are all actually lanterns, lit from the inside, and made of paper glued onto a wire framework. Here are the main lanterns our center has made this year for Buddha’s Birthday(May 6th, this year. Tomorrow, April 29th will also be the second anniversary of Daehaeng Kun Sunim’s passing.)

I hope these photos give some idea of how incredible they are. When I first saw the finished lanterns, I could only stare at them. No words would come out. (Click on the images to see the full size, about 250kb.)

float


The main float

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A close up of the back of the float. Notice the 3D Buddhas manifesting from the cosmic Buddha into this world.

A close up of the back of the float. Notice the 3D Buddhas manifesting from the cosmic Buddha into this world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A practitioner, but notice how even on a barren peak, a pine tree is fully alive, as the crane on the other peak.

A practitioner, but notice how even on a barren peak, a pine tree is fully alive, as the crane on the other peak.

 

 

A close up of the pratitioner

A close up of the practitioner

and now the full float

and now the full float

 

 

 

2float 2

 

 

 

 

 

details from a tree that forms the third float

details from a tree that forms the third float

 

 

 

 

each leaf is hand made

each leaf is hand-made, and I love the butterflies!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wake Up and Laugh: Everyday spiritual practice

Wake Up_Small   We have a new book that’s just come out through Wisdom Publications in the US. It’s an awesome collection of Dharma talks by Daehaeng Kun Sunim.  These talks are mainly about the basics of spiritual practice, but they also have a lot about what we have to do once we start having experiences and begin to shed the shell of “I.” The first talk is one of my favorites, because she is very clear about what letting go of “I” and “me” looks like, and shows us how to avoid getting led astray after we’ve had some experience at practice. In its essence, practice is the same for the beginner as well as for the long-time practitioner, and all the materials of your daily life are the fuel of your practice.

You should entrust everything that comes up in your life—solitude, poverty, loneliness, anxiety, illness—entrust this all to your foundation and live freely. Entrusting everything is letting go of attachments; it is the path of dying. “First, you must die!” means unconditionally letting go of everything, including what you understand and what you don’t understand. It means letting go without clinging to reasons or excuses.

(I want to paste everything up here! It really is that good.)

 

Dharma Talks in Chicago

I’ll be in the Chicago area (Skokie) in May, and will be giving Dharma talks at the Hanmaum Zen Center there. Two talks are scheduled, one for May 10, the other for May 13, so if you are interested, by all means stop by.  I’ll also be at the center for several days afterwards, so feel free to stop by. (Just call ahead to coordinate schedules.) Here’s an excerpt from the flyer they printed up:

 


 

Born in the U.S., he was ordained as a Buddhist monk in Korea in 1993, and has practiced there for the last twenty years. He is a Dharma student of the outstanding Seon Master, Daehaeng, and also works to help translate her Dharma talks into English.

Chong Go Sunim will talk about how to apply spiritual practice in our daily life, and how we can overcome the fixed ideas and habits that hold us back.

Spiritual practice is an odd thing. On the one hand we’re already endowed with everything we need. We’re connected to all the energy and wisdom in the Universe, and it’s always flowing through us, there for us to use. Yet, often we can’t use this, and go through life feeling like something’s missing. Like somehow we are deeply incomplete.

So although we are complete as we are, we have to learn to put this into practice; we have to learn to let go of the fixed ideas and habits that keep us going in circles. In a sense, learning what to do isn’t that hard. It’s applying it where things get tricky. But that’s also where we can experience true freedom and open up our potential as human beings.

We hope you can join us for this rare opportunity to learn about spiritual practice and the Dharma.


1st talk : 7:00 pm Saturday, May 10
2nd talk: 7:30 pm Tuesday, May 13
place : Hanmaum Zen Center
7852 N. Lincoln Ave. Skokie, IL 60077
(Tel: 847-674-0811)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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